Kathleen Hsu
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Coinbase

This past summer, I spent 14 weeks at Coinbase as a Product Design Intern on the Consumer team. My first project was a redesign of the clawback experience.

 

This past summer, I spent 14 weeks at Coinbase as a Product Design Intern on the Consumer team. One of my first projects was a redesign of the clawback experience to increase the number of users who pay back the funds they owe.


The Problem

Users are placed in a clawback state in the case where they purchase cryptocurrency or deposit funds into their Coinbase account, but did not have enough funds in the bank account or credit card that was used for the transaction. From the 1,000 to 2,000 transfers per week that this impacts, 90% of funds are recovered after two weeks and users are only initiating about 15% of those funds.

The current clawback experience is sub-optimal, as users are not given information on why they have restrictions on their account and when the clawback process will begin. After users in this state log into their Coinbase account, they are sent to a page that looks completely different from the rest of the platform.

 Existing clawback page

Existing clawback page

I was tasked to redesign the end-to-end experience for users in the clawback state. The main goal was to make the self-recovery process more intuitive and transparent. This would enable users to decide which payment method(s) to return the owed funds with and have the restrictions on their account removed sooner. 


User Flow

Although the user flow did not change for this redesign, it was helpful to map out a high-level flow to understand the entire system and what screens I needed to make designs for.

  1. When a user owes Coinbase funds, their ability to buy or send cryptocurrency is disabled.

  2. The user is notified through email and has five days to voluntarily pay back the funds, using one or multiple payment options. If the user completes the full payment, their account restrictions will be removed.

  3. If the user does not complete the full payment by the end of the five day grace period, Coinbase will attempt to clawback funds from the fiat and cryptocurrency accounts that user has on platform, in addition to any connected payment methods. 

  4. If the clawback system fails to retrieve the full payment after trying all of the user’s accounts and payment methods, the user will have account restrictions until they add a payment method and complete the full payment.


Explorations

After the user flow was established, I made several iterations of wireframes. The payment screen was the most challenging part of this redesign, as there was a lot of variation between the payment methods users had.

My initial design allowed users to combine funds from their Coinbase fiat wallet and bank account(s) to make the payment. While users would be able to use multiple payment options to make a single payment, the UI would be overwhelming for users with many payment method options.

The option of selling cryptocurrency to fund the payment also added another layer of complexity:

  • The experience would be confusing for users, as they would be brought to the existing sell modal and may not remember how much they needed to sell.

  • There would be high friction, as users would have to navigate back to the payments screen from the initial screen in the clawbacks flow after selling cryptocurrency. 

 Initial payment screen

Initial payment screen

To resolve those challenges, I decided to focus the user on making one payment at a time with a single drop-down. If users choose to sell cryptocurrency, they can select the wallet and Coinbase would sell the cryptocurrency necessary to fund the payment.

 Final payment screen

Final payment screen


Final Design

The entire redesign was launched as an A/B test the week before I finished my internship. Success will be determined by the percentage of users who successfully pay back the funds they owe during the five day grace period compared to in the original design.


Desktop Web

Check out the interactive prototype at this link: https://invis.io/X8OBK4834NE

Below is the core flow in which a user has a single failed payment and successfully pays back the transaction with the funds in their Coinbase account.

 Butter bar on the Dashboard page warning user about their account restrictions and upcoming clawback.

Butter bar on the Dashboard page warning user about their account restrictions and upcoming clawback.

 User would select the failed payment.

User would select the failed payment.

 User would select a payment method from the drop-down.

User would select a payment method from the drop-down.

 User would confirm the payment amount and method.

User would confirm the payment amount and method.

 Payment complete! User’s account restrictions would be removed.

Payment complete! User’s account restrictions would be removed.


Mobile App

Based on the redesigned web screens, I designed and prototyped the same flow for the mobile app: https://invis.io/2SOF6TJ6Y4K

As there wasn’t enough engineering bandwidth to build the full flow on the mobile app, I created a notification banner on the main Prices page that could be implemented in the interim. The CTA button would take users to an in-app mobile web page to make the payment.


Emails

I also designed emails on web and mobile to notify users about paying back the funds they owe, confirming the payments they made, and the status of the clawback system. I partnered with a content strategist to write clear and friendly copy that would empower users to pay back the funds they owed before the clawback process would begin. Below are a couple of the emails.

 Initial notification email alerting users of their failed payment

Initial notification email alerting users of their failed payment

 User successfully completes full payment

User successfully completes full payment


Reflections

The biggest lesson I learned from this project was to get feedback from as many people as possible early in the design process. While the engineers were already building the designs of my initial final concept, I received feedback during a product review that the payment screen was too complex. Consequently, I considered a broader range of solutions to achieve a final design that would be more intuitive. I also learned the importance of being open to constructive feedback all the way through the design process.

I had the incredible opportunity to work on several other projects during the course of my internship, but am unable to share them publicly since they have not been launched. If you would like to know more about my experience, feel free to reach out at kathleen.hsu@berkeley.edu. I also shared some lessons I learned over the summer in this blog post